Monthly Archives: July 2014

Summer Storm Safety Tips from Mister Sparky Phoenix

With the arrival of summer and the rising temperatures also comes the arrival of monsoon season in the Valley. That can mean strong thunderstorms, heavy rain, lightning and high winds. Your trusted electricians at Mister Sparky® offer these tips to help protect your home and electronics during monsoon season. First, consider these tips before the storms:

Tip #1: Be storm ready.  Create an emergency plan now, while the sun is still shining. Stock up on battery operated flashlights, a radio and even battery operated fans. Identify a safe place in your home, away from doors and windows where you can wait safely until the storm passes.

Tip #2: Keep all your important papers in a water-proof, fire-proof container.

Tip #3:  Consider a whole house electrical inspection. Mister Sparky offers a 36 point whole house electrical inspection. Our trained electricians can inspect your electrical panel to make sure it’s not overloaded, make sure the wiring to your breakers are tight, do a surge protection risk assessment, check all smoke detectors in your home and check to insure all electrical elements are up to code.

If you want an extra level of protection consider a professionally installed surge protection and even stand by generators.  Lightning that can accompany these monsoon storms can damage the motors to your expensive appliances like your HVAC system.  If you’ve seen your lights dim or glow yellow this could be a power surge in your system and that can damage the motors in your appliances.  Professionally installed surge protection senses dips in voltage and can turn motors off for a short period or until your electrical current is consistent. Many home owners have added this to their HVAC systems and found peace of mind and protection. When properly installed surge protection can help take unwanted peaks in voltage to the ground, not your appliances.

TIP # 4:  Trim all the trees and bushes away from your home.   Clean your gutters and downspouts in preparation for heavy storms.

During a Storm

Stay in a safe area away from windows and doors. If electricity is lost use battery operated flashlights. Candles can be hazardous because of the fire risk and carbon monoxide. If you are using a generator, the Electrical Safety Foundation International strongly recommends that it be installed by a licensed electrician. Remember: never operate a generator inside or in an enclosed area (like a garage,) never operate it in wet conditions, and don’t open windows or doors near the generator which can allow fumes to enter your home. Make sure you have a battery operated carbon monoxide alarm.  If water is rising, turn off the main breaker to your electric panel.[1]

After a Storm

Be alert for downed power lines or gas leaks.  If your home is flooded call a licensed electrician before turning on the main circuit breaker.  Make sure appliances or equipment that may have been exposed to water are completely dry and checked by a qualified electrician or repair person before using.[2]

In Arizona, electricians should be licensed through the Arizona Registrar of Contractors. The state has minimum requirements on years of experience, training, schooling, insurance and bonding a licensed electrician must have. If a contractor performs work that is not up to code, or in violation of state law, the Arizona Registrar of Contractors can investigate. At Mister Sparky, we meet and exceed all the minimum requirements set forth by the Arizona Registrar of Contractors for licensing. The website to verify the license of an electrician is www.azroc.gov.  You can search by name, company name, license number or city where you live. Look for a listed place of business on all documents, beware of someone who can just provide a phone number. Ask about experience, guarantees for the work and upfront, StraightForward Pricing®

For more electrical safety tips, contact Mister Sparky.



[1] Information from http://www.esfi.org/index.cfm/cdid/13135/pid/10272 was used in this report

[2] Information from  http://www.esfi.org/index.cfm/cdid/13137/pid/10272 was used in this report